February 2019

Employee Spotlight: Kyle Canon

2019-02-25T15:02:58-05:00February 25th, 2019|Employee Spotlights|

Kyle Canon understands the importance of teamwork and project collaboration. Having worked in multiple positions himself, he is a firm supporter of learning about the different types of work performed on site. This has helped him tackle problems and perform his best work.

Briefly describe your career path to date.

I’ve worked in multiple market channels since I started my career. In each channel, I’ve had different roles such as estimator, project engineer, and superintendent. Each position taught me a great deal about construction.

Construction can be a challenging business. Do you have a specific approach or philosophy you use to tackle challenges as they arise on site?

Challenges can be tackled when we work as a team and successfully implement project collaboration. There are always several disciplines on site. Instead of working individually, we unite, communicate, and do an outstanding job.

What is the most important thing you do each day when prepping for your work day?

I like to start each morning by making my to do list and determining the order of importance. This is a great way to keep me organized. It also helps me keep track of the products that have been approved, as well as their scheduled installation. Tracking this ensures that we stay on schedule with installations.

Who inspires you?

My dad has always been my greatest role model.

What is the most important lesson you have learned in the last year?

Never be afraid to ask questions. Construction is complex; it’s better to be certain how to do something rather than guessing. The more you know helps you and the team perform at a higher level.

What piece of technology helps you most with your job? And why?

At Summa [Health’s Akron City Hospital] West Tower, CAD and the modeling programs were tremendous in helping me do my job. While I was not the operator of these programs, they were key in my management of the envelope team coordination. These programs allowed each team member to confidently install the steel embeds, structural steel, curtain wall embeds, curtain walls and envelope framing/finish systems.

July 2018

Construction Around an Occupied Facility

2018-07-23T14:15:19-04:00July 23rd, 2018|Case Study, Client Service, Thought Leadership|

Many of our projects involve working in, around, above, or below occupied facilities. This scenario involves not only creative techniques to tie in to the existing building, but also increased communication with your staff to coordinate construction activity around critical—and unplanned—operations.
 
Construction Above and Next to Occupied Facility
One such project was the addition and renovation of St. Elizabeth Boardman Health Center, which involved the following general scope items:
 
  • Two-story addition above existing surgery suites
  • Six-story, 184,000 SF tower addition above the existing lobby and surgery suites
  • Various renovations to the existing structure
Because of the construction above the existing surgery units, extra coordination with the surgeons dictated when we needed to halt our work for a planned—or unplanned—surgery. Below are some specific obstacles to overcome.
 

Reinforcing Columns

One of those obstacles was presented by the existing OR’s steel columns, which were designed to accommodate a one-story addition; however, this project added two stories. Our team developed a plan to reinforce the steel columns without any interruptions to the surgery schedules. To accomplish this, our team built a plan to–over the course of eight weekends–systematically tackle the steel columns, two or three per weekend.
 
  • Friday night: tear out the drywall.
  • Saturday morning: weld stiffening plates and angles to the columns.
  • Saturday night: fireproof the columns.
  • Sunday: patch up the drywall, paint and clean up.
The team would begin work after the last surgery Friday night and leave the operating room spotless by Sunday night, showing no signs of our presence.
 

Maintaining Existing Roof during Construction

The existing OR roof needed to remain in place during the two-story vertical expansion.  Over a three-week period, our project team built temporary roof curbs over each column that needed to expand vertically.  This allowed us the flexibility to open up the roof when the weather cooperated, remove the curb cap and make the appropriate structural connections.  The roof then was temporarily flashed back around the added columns.  After the vertical expansion was built and dried-in, the existing OR floor roof was then removed to make way for the interior build-out of the NICU floor (1st story of the two-story addition).
 
As the finishing work of the two floors commenced, our project team continued to coordinate work around the surgery schedules because the finished project did not allow as much insulation above the OR to minimize noise and vibration from certain construction activity (i.e., rolling around drywall on carts). At times, it was necessary to cease construction immediately to accommodate planned/unplanned surgeries.
 

Connecting the Old to the New 

Connecting all floors horizontally to the existing building also provided several challenges.  One was keeping the building dry. To address this, we left the existing façade intact and only opened it up at each beam connection. Once the building was dried-in, we then demolished the existing exterior walls/façade.  Another challenge was matching existing elevations at the floor level without removing the whole façade.  Strategically located as-built elevations were taken to allow us to build the new structure and make field modifications prior to removing the façade.
 
Despite these impediments, we persevered. With our core value of being reliable in mind, we found new ways to accomplish these tasks and stayed true to our promise of finishing on time, even if it meant working overtime and on weekends. At the end of it all, we were proud of our determination and what we had created with all the cards stacked against us.    
 

October 2016

Using 3D Animation to Help Summa Health Visualize Project

2016-10-31T08:20:04-04:00October 31st, 2016|Project News, Thought Leadership|

Summa Health 3D Animation

Summa Health is embarking on a journey to build a new bed tower at Akron City Hospital in Akron, Ohio. Shook Construction has joined forces with Donley’s to provide construction management services for this $152 million project.

During the interview process, the Donley’s – Shook team set out to not only help Summa Health see their project come to life, but also help them understand the construction process along with how our team would approach their project. To accomplish this, our team developed a 3D model of the project and the construction sequencing (as shown below).


* Note: this is only a short snippet of the full model

Using this model, the Donley’s – Shook team was able to explain visually the major milestones in construction, along with what some of the logistic challenges might be.

Beyond the interview, this model will help with so much more than simply visualizing the project:

  • Engage in a more collaborative working environment allowing for higher quality of work
  • Identify conflicts/issues earlier in the project through clash detection, which ultimately leads to greater productivity in the field
  • Improved communication and project coordination by utilizing a 3-D logistics plan
  • Better design and spatial coordination where the design is completed with fabrication in mind
  • Minimize, reduce or eliminate waste
  • Increase productivity through prefabrication on or off-site
  • Improved constructability reviews, schedules, quantity takeoffs cost estimating and scheduling

Project Scope

The new six-story, 331,000 SF west bed tower will serve as the hospital’s new main entrance and will house two 36-bed medical/surgical units with all private rooms, a breast center, eight new operating rooms, 65 same-day surgery rooms and a women’s health center that includes a 36-bed post-partum unit.

The project also includes the renovation of 64,000 square feet of the existing hospital. These renovations will focus on the ground floor imaging department and first floor surgery, as well as create private inpatient rooms within the existing patient floors.

Construction will begin in early 2017 with substantial completion in the spring of 2019. The architect on the project is a partnership between Akron-based Hasenstab Architects and Cleveland-based Perspectus Architecture.