May 2018

Employee Spotlight: J.D. Craft

2018-05-02T15:03:10-04:00May 2nd, 2018|Employee Spotlights|

J.D. Craft is no stranger to working outdoors. His childhood was spent growing up on a farm, which led to him later wanting a career where he could be outside as much as possible. He began his career as a carpenter and now serves as a project superintendent for Shook.

Construction can be a challenging business. Do you have a specific approach or philosophy you use to tackle challenges as they arise on site?

I keep in mind that I’m unable to control everything. Construction has taught me to prepare for the worst-case scenario—you never know what to expect.

What are the most important qualities of a leader?

Having the ability to adapt to your environment, as well as maintaining a level head when things go wrong.

What does safety mean to you?

Sending everyone home in one piece! The last thing I want is to have to take somebody to the hospital, or worse.

What is a specific skillset or attribute you possess that you believe adds value to your projects?

I can picture shapes before we build them, so I have a pretty good idea of what will or will not look good.

What is the most important lesson you have learned in the last year?

Those who can, do.

October 2017

Employee Spotlight: Joe Weaver

2017-03-27T15:44:01-04:00October 12th, 2017|Employee Spotlights|

Joe Weaver

Joe grew up working with his hands. He worked with his father every summer throughout junior and high school in remodeling. After starting his professional career as a lead installer and carpenter, he eventually joined the Shook team as a project superintendent where he currently oversees multiple projects at the University of Dayton.

What inspired you to get into this career?

I enjoy the changing environment and the personal gratification of seeing a project through completion. I believe that my inspiration originated when I became a young father and having to step up to the plate. But at the end of the day, my own father is who inspired me and the pursuit of purpose is what continues to drive me today.

Do you have a specific approach or philosophy you use to tackle challenges as they arise on site?

I lean towards a collaborative solution, reaching out to a group to solve challenges after I have analyzed them myself. I try to look at what may have caused the issue and then train the team and give them a chance to take ownership in the solution.

What is the most important thing you do each day when prepping for your workday?

Drink coffee! Then I break out attainable tasks to fit in between what already might be slated for the day.

What are the most important qualities of a leader?

Reliability, communication, passion, innovation and consistency.

What’s the coolest thing you’re working on right now?

The finalization of a research and development laboratory at the University of Dayton. This nine-month, multiple phase project consisted of heavy coordination of two shifts of construction work… all while maintaining occupancy of the existing building.

Who inspires you?

Mostly, my wife and daughter. They give me a reason to be.

September 2017

Employee Spotlight: Andy Lowther

2017-03-27T15:31:08-04:00September 14th, 2017|Employee Spotlights|

Andy Lowther

Andrew has worn many hats at several other companies before joining the Shook family. Those experiences have equipped him to help expand our education market segment in Northeast Ohio.

What inspired you to get into this career?

My grandfather, who was a carpenter. I worked with him during the summers since middle school. Since I was good at school, he encouraged me to work with my brains and not my brawn. With the help of my high school counselor, I discovered the construction management program at The Ohio State University. The rest is history.

What is the most important thing you do each day when prepping for your workday?

Coffee… I drink coffee. Then I make an action plan for the day. I always carry a pocket notebook to write things down. It is easy to forget things. If I check my notebook, it reminds me of things I noted earlier. Then I will address those items before adding more notes.

What is a specific skill-set or attribute you possess that you believe adds value to your projects?

Determination and hard work. I grew up a wrestler and those attributes were developed over a lifetime of wrestling. Those same attributes seem to transfer over into everything I do.

What is the most important lesson you have learned in the last year?

Building relationships. Relationships ensure strong jobs and develop future/ongoing clients.

Who inspires you?

My son. I want to be the best person I can be for him. The more I develop and grow as a person, the better person I can shape my son to be.

July 2017

Employee Spotlight: Jerry Roark

2017-02-21T15:17:39-05:00July 13th, 2017|Employee Spotlights|

Employee Spotlight: Jerry Roark

With 33 years of construction experience under his belt, Jerry has truly worked his way up through the ranks. He began his career as a pre-apprentice, moving to a journeyman carpenter position, then served as a foreman. Now, Jerry is a project superintendent and can tout a 27-year history with Shook Construction.

What inspired you to get into this career?

I wanted to follow in my father’s footsteps, who was a carpenter. Beyond that, I enjoy taking my kids and grandkids around town, pointing out the building projects on which I have worked.

What is the coolest thing you’re working on right now?

The Dayton Metro Library buildings. The project involves several buildings, all of which are unique.

What is a specific skill-set or attribute you possess that you believe adds value to your projects?

Dedication, hands-on experience, common sense, planning the work, as well as communicating with the owners, architects and workforce.

What is the most important thing you do each day when prepping for your workday?

There is no ONE important thing I do. To be successful, I have to have a holistic view of the day. This includes safety planning, planning for the equipment needed that day, ensuring employees have the material needed to the do the job, using the right people for the job, and consulting with the foremen.

What is the most important lesson you have learned in the last year?

How to manage multiple job sites at different locations.

What piece of technology helps you most with your job and why?

My smart phone allows me access to my email while away from the office. In addition, my tablet allows me to pull up current/updated drawings in the field and mark them for as-builts so all crews have updated drawings in the field.