March 2019

Maximize Project Collaboration Using the Design-Build Delivery Method

2019-03-19T08:12:19-04:00March 19th, 2019|Project News, Thought Leadership|

Design-build has grown in popularity the last few years since Ohio legislation made it available to public entities. It certainly has its advantages by giving the owner one single point of contact throughout the entire project, as well as providing opportunities for cost and schedule savings. We discussed these particular benefits in a previous blog post here.

Now that the new water treatment plant is complete for the Village of Yellow Springs in Ohio, we would like to share some specific examples of how design-build maximizes project collaboration.

Water Resources Construction

During Design and Preconstruction

Under the design-build umbrella, the construction and design firms work together with the owner to maximize the project budget.  Constructability and schedule issues are identified during design and value-added solutions then can be incorporated. 

In this case, we continually analyzed various design approaches to ultimately arrive at the most efficient concept ensuring the project stayed within the Village’s borrowing ceiling. One of those enhancements included relocating the new building to minimize yard piping and electrical wiring.

During Construction

Another advantage of design-build is that the owner has a single point of contact.  When design problems arise, the owner is not positioned between the designer and contractor, along with the possibility of added project costs.  Design-build usually involves a Gross Maximum Price (GMP) for which the project will be both designed and constructed. In addition, a contingency is used for unanticipated costs and any savings often are shared between the owner and design-builder.  This results in a project cost profile that decreases as a function of time, unlike traditional design-bid-build where cost increases with time.

Additionally, we collaborated with the designer to develop a 3D construction sequencing model, specifically as it relates to the concrete pours. This allowed us to not only visualize the placement of the concrete, but how the timing may affect other areas of the project. The 3D model also allowed the client to visualize the interior of the process building and confirm that the design provided ease of operations and maintenance. 

To learn more, we invite you to attend our conference session on April 11th as part of the Design-Build for Water/Wastewater Conference in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Shook Construction proudly partnered with designer Jones & Henry. The team also included D.A.G. Construction, Chapel Electric and Dmytryka Jacobs Engineers.

Using Technology to Improve Project Performance

2019-03-07T07:50:53-05:00March 6th, 2019|Project News, Thought Leadership|

Shook continuously searches for ways to dramatically improve our performance. As the industry evolves, it is increasingly apparent how essential technology is. Not only does it save us time and money, but also it attracts new talent and customers. Recently, we introduced the enhanced technology processes, which have tremendously benefited our projects.

DRONE TECHNOLOGY

James Hillegas, a project engineer at Shook, has been an avid drone pilot for years. When he became aware of the opportunity to use them onsite, he was ready to help.

Mapping Existing Site Work  

At the Community Tissue Services project in Kettering, Ohio, James used drones to gather sitework images which he then shared with Project Manager Matt Wendel. The data collected assisted Matt in narrowing in on the site work estimations, which in turn freed up funds to reallocate to other project needs.

Bringing the Project to Life: Augmented Reality 

Hillegas also used a drone to gather photos of the existing facility, which then were used to create a model of the new building. This model allowed the owner to visualize how their new building would look when completed. “Augmented reality helps the owner better understand the project,” Hillegas said.

Source: John Poe Architects

Ensuring Safety

On the Summa West Tower project in Akron, Ohio, a drone helped us proactively prepare for the possibility of an emergency. As the project progressed, James flew the drone to collect updated site photos. These images were sent to the fire department to communicate where access points were in the event of an emergency.

PLANGRID TECHNOLOGY

Improving Onsite Efficiency  

Source: firstround.com

Another device introduced on the Summa project was PlanGrid, a cloud-based program that grants users mobile access to project information, including document drawings. PlanGrid has been incredibly helpful with organization and timeliness. All the project drawings were accessible in the program, which kept the project team from wasting time flipping through pages of drawings.

Project Engineer Rachel Mulholland shared the benefits of using it, stating, “Having all the drawings on the same system has saved us a considerable amount of time.”

Holding Subcontractors Accountable

PlanGrid alleviated some of the stress during closeout procedures. Shook asked their subcontractors to use the program to track and report the overall schedule. This helped keep everyone accountable. The team would open PlanGrid to check the floor plans and, based on the information, assign tasks to certain people. Rachel found this to be one of the greatest benefits of the program.

Technology is improving our productivity and enhancing our ability to communicate. From saving time to solving problems proactively, these tools have drastically changed the way we perform our work.