Blog/News

Diamond Wire Sawing Process of Twin 108″ Concrete Pipes

September 1, 2017, 7:23 am

As part of the Easterly treatment facility project on the shores of Lake Erie in Cleveland, Ohio, our project team built six 110-foot diameter by 18-foot deep settling tanks. The discharge from these new tanks (as well as four existing tanks) were connected to a NEW concrete junction chamber via 2500 lineal feet of 36-inch through 84-inch diameter Flowtite® fiberglass underground pipe.

This new junction chamber was constructed around two temporarily supported 108-inch diameter concrete pipes. These pipes have carried the treated discharge from the existing plant to Lake Erie since 1931.

Once the new facilities were complete, the challenge was tying the new facilities to the old discharge. To accomplish this, the project team removed 11 feet of pipe from each of those two 108-inch diameter, 10.5-inch thick concrete pipes.  

NEORSD 108" Twin Pipes

To ensure this process did not interrupt the existing flow to the lake, the project team engaged DOT Diamond Core Drilling who suggested a diamond wire sawing system to make two cuts in each of the two pipes.

To accomplish this feat, the project team first installed temporary pipe supports and made preparations for hoisting and handling both pipes while the chamber was still dry. DOT then began the diamond wire sawing process, aided by external cooling water. When the first in-service pipe’s circumference was penetrated, the plant flow began to flood the chamber. The remaining sawing process was completed without any personnel having to enter the chamber. The resulting cuts totaled 1,620 lineal inches of reinforced concrete.

Diamond Saw Cutting Process

Once cut, General Crane Rental used a 130-ton capacity crane to hoist out the two 11-foot cut pieces, each weighing about 37,000 pounds.

Making this effort even more impressive is that the pipe removal and subsequent joining of the old and new flow systems were completed during 15-degree temperature and blustery winds in mid-December.

Despite the frigid weather and the difficulty of this task, the entire operation took only two 12-hour days to complete.

Project Overview

This process was part of the larger $74.3 million project which began in September 2013. The overall purpose was to increase the capacity of the Easterly Wastewater Treatment Plant from 140 million gallons per day to 400 million gallons per day, which will help the environment.

The Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer District (NEORSD) contracted the Shook Walbridge Joint Venture to complete these improvements, which were designed by MWH Global and Brown & Caldwell. The design called for the installation of 26 new pumps, piping, automated valves and meters, as well as adding chemical storage, distribution, metering, instrumentation and process equipment to more effectively enhance the treatment process. To accomplish this, the Shook Walbridge team selectively removed, rerouted and replaced interior and underground piping, existing structures, and equipment.

The multi-phase project took four years to complete.

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Our Core Values: Quality

March 27, 2017, 12:32 pm

Quality: core values

We operate by a core set of nine values. This month, we focus on quality.

Quality equals building excellence. Our goal is to ensure our clients are receiving the construction project they expect for the dollars they are investing. Why do we do this? First, it is the right thing to do. Second, we cannot be a successful company by offering sub-par quality. We are proud of our “reputation built on performance”—and performance begins with quality.

It is important to us to establish the standard and measure quality from the beginning of a project rather than simply evaluating quality at the end of a project. What processes do we have in place to ensure that every project is a quality one? Here are just a few:

3D Modeling

We create a detailed model that shows the work in place, which helps trade contractors visualize their scope of work. We also use the model to coordinate building elements and to plan the project’s sequencing and durations.

Quality: BIM Images

Mock-Ups and First-in-Place Inspections

Particularly for projects that contain repetitive spaces (such as hospital patient rooms), we use a first-in-place inspection process. This involves the inspection of the first piece of work put in place to verify quality. This install then becomes the quality standard for the balance of the project.  This process can include mock-ups of a specific area, which our team reviews for quality (and our owners review for aesthetics and functionality).

Weekly Progress Meetings

We hold weekly job coordination meetings with subcontractors, trades and material suppliers during which we review schedule, coordination of work, quality of work and safety/security requirements.

Quality Control Checklist

Each of our field personnel carry a pocket-sized quality control checklist, which breaks down standards of work by division. This provides us a portable tool to review the quality of work with each of our subcontractors.

Ongoing Punch Lists

We do not believe in waiting until the end of the project to develop a punch list. We create an ongoing punch list at the beginning of a project so that our subcontractors can correct deficiencies in a timely manner. We review this punch list at our weekly progress meetings. We also encourage our owners and design partners to participate in developing the punch list items. This helps our subcontractors understand the expectations early on in the project and facilitates prompt close-out of the job.

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Using 3D Animation to Help Summa Health Visualize Project

October 31, 2016, 8:06 am

Summa Health 3D Animation Summa Health is embarking on a journey to build a new bed tower at Akron City Hospital in Akron, Ohio. Shook Construction has joined forces with Donley’s to provide construction management services for this $152 million project. During the interview process, the Donley’s – Shook team set out to not only help Summa Health see their project come to life, but also help them understand the construction process along with how our team would approach their project. To accomplish this, our team developed a 3D model of the project and the construction sequencing (as shown below). * Note: this is only a short snippet of the full model Using this model, the Donley’s – Shook team was able to explain visually the major milestones in construction, along with what some of the logistic challenges might be. Beyond the interview, this model will help with so much more than simply visualizing the project:
  • Engage in a more collaborative working environment allowing for higher quality of work
  • Identify conflicts/issues earlier in the project through clash detection, which ultimately leads to greater productivity in the field
  • Improved communication and project coordination by utilizing a 3-D logistics plan
  • Better design and spatial coordination where the design is completed with fabrication in mind
  • Minimize, reduce or eliminate waste
  • Increase productivity through prefabrication on or off-site
  • Improved constructability reviews, schedules, quantity takeoffs cost estimating and scheduling

Project Scope

The new six-story, 331,000 SF west bed tower will serve as the hospital’s new main entrance and will house two 36-bed medical/surgical units with all private rooms, a breast center, eight new operating rooms, 65 same-day surgery rooms and a women’s health center that includes a 36-bed post-partum unit. The project also includes the renovation of 64,000 square feet of the existing hospital. These renovations will focus on the ground floor imaging department and first floor surgery, as well as create private inpatient rooms within the existing patient floors. Construction will begin in early 2017 with substantial completion in the spring of 2019. The architect on the project is a partnership between Akron-based Hasenstab Architects and Cleveland-based Perspectus Architecture.  

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Groundbreaking of New Design-Build Water Treatment Plant

September 30, 2016, 1:24 pm

Yellow Springs WTP Rendering Shook Construction is making history as the Village of Yellow Springs broke ground on its new water treatment plant. What is unique about this project is that it will be constructed under the design-build project delivery method. It is the first of its kind for Shook within its water resources market channel, and it is the first brand new design-build water treatment plant in the State of Ohio. Ohio legislation made the design-build delivery model available to public entities just a few years ago. Since then, eight other public agencies have broken ground on their water/wastewater treatment plant-related projects, making the Village of Yellow Springs #9. Not only that, but the Village’s project is the 2nd largest design-build water/wastewater project in the state. What makes the design-build project delivery beneficial to public entities? Here are a couple reasons:

Single Point of Responsibility

Unlike the design-bid-build process where the owner is responsible for hiring a designer and contractor and then is responsible for serving as the liaison between the two, now the owner can hire one firm who manages both the design and construction. This in turn fosters heightened collaboration among team members, which ultimately sets the stage for a successful construction project.

Cost Savings

In the design-bid-build process, design changes late in the process (particularly after construction has started) are extremely costly to the owner. Having the construction team at the table early on under the design-build model means scope decisions can be made earlier in the process. In addition, the design and construction teams work together to ensure the project is designed to budget.

Time Savings

Under the design-build model, the design and construction phases can overlap, allowing construction to begin while the design is still underway. This helps expedite the overall project schedule, as well as reduces costs and makes a new facility available to the owner earlier. The Village of Yellow Springs recognized these advantages when it chose to build its water plant under the design-build model. Karen Wintrow, president of Council for the Village, shared that they selected design-build as a way to be more involved in the design process, as well as to have more control over the budget. Shook Construction is proud to partner with designer Jones & Henry. Also on the team is D.A.G. Construction, Chapel Electric and Dmytryka Jacobs Engineers. The $7.2 million project will be complete in late 2017.

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Planning Our Work Using VDC

June 10, 2016, 12:39 pm

Do you have trouble picturing how your construction partner plans to protect your existing environment during a renovation project? We understand that not everyone comprehends information in the same way. That is one of many benefits from incorporating Virtual Design & Construction (VDC) into our construction pre-planning process. VDC uses 3D modeling to optimize project planning. It allows our team to visualize, analyze, plan and manage complex projects. It also helps us visually share our plan with clients. For example, we recently renovated a data center that remained operational throughout construction. To avoid interrupting business operations, we divided the project into six phases. As we worked through each phase, we erected temporary partitions to separate our work zones from office personnel. The video below helped our client visualize how we planned to protect their data center during construction activities. The client then used this same video to relay the plan to their employees. Communication is paramount no matter the business or the project. It is equally vital during a construction project. VDC is helping us take that communication to a new level.

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Preparing Owners for Data Center Construction

May 24, 2016, 9:48 am

Data Center Construction Shook Construction’s Chris Halapy and Steve Seal presented at last week’s Mission Critical Facilities & Technology Conference in northeast Ohio. Their session titled “Construction in the Data Center: How to Prepare” walked owners through what to expect when contractors begin work in an active data center, along with policies and procedures to implement throughout construction. An estimated 40 individuals learned about effective pre-project planning, risk management tools and strategies, temporary operations and much more! Mission critical facilities include data center, telecommunications buildings and call centers. Shook Construction first got involved in the mission critical arena 16 years ago while working with AT&T (formerly SBC Communications). Since then, our team has performed construction services for numerous mission critical clients with work in place totaling nearly $500 million. Most of these clients have relied us on time and time again to help them with their construction needs. The priorities on any given project are quality, timeliness and fiscal responsibility. However, managing a mission critical facility project is further complicated by the need to keep the facility fully operational throughout construction. Developing a method of procedures (MOP) is crucial for any type of work in an active data center. This MOP addresses issues such as dust protection, negative air pressure, vibration and moisture minimization, as well as maintenance window work. To develop a uniform and consistent process for addressing these challenges, Shook Construction created a Standard Network Awareness Training (NAT) program. Every worker must complete this program before setting foot onto one of our mission critical job sites. One of our major clients adopted this training globally and it’s now responsible for training more than 13,000 contractors each year. These are only a few brief examples of the types of items Shook Construction considers on every one of our projects. For more information, please contact us at info@shookconstruction.com!

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Equipment Warranties: Do You Know What You’re Getting?

April 20, 2016, 10:38 am

Gears PhotoPicture this: You recently completed construction of your brand new facility. Contractors have vacated the site. The equipment manufacturer performs its annual service inspection and discovers “wear and tear” items that are not covered under the existing warranty. To top it off, the manufacturer claims that these items should not be wearing out so early in their life cycle and you are stuck with the bill to replace these parts. Sound familiar? How can you make sure this doesn’t happen? 4 WAYS YOUR CONSTRUCTION PARTNER CAN HELP

1: Make sure your construction partner completes a Certification of Warranty Commencement Form

This form details each new piece of equipment along with its respective warranty start dates and its warranty duration. This information should be provided to you for every warranty item on the project, in a well-organized format so that you can clearly review and understand what is or is not covered.

2: Ensure your construction partner verifies you are getting the right warranty specific to your needs

This “begin with the end” mentality will minimize a lot of heartache later on. Warranties are not a “one size fits all” concept. As such, your construction partner will review the warranties for each piece of equipment to verify they will satisfy your needs in the long run.

3: Request that your construction partner performs an 11-month walk-thru

Don’t let your construction partner wash its hands of your project once the construction trailers are gone. Ensure they plan a walk-thru of your facility with your staff and all appropriate subcontractors to make sure everything is working properly. If something isn’t right, they can get it addressed before the warranty period expires.

4: Ask (before you hire) if your construction partner will be available beyond not only the project end-date, but also the warranty period

Due diligence in purchasing the best equipment, guaranteeing the best warranty and ensuring the building was working properly prior to the warranty expiration date doesn’t ensure issues won’t arise. Things happen; it’s life. A stand-up construction firm will continue to look after your best interests well beyond the warranty period. An even better construction firm will take ownership of the issues and personally ensure they are fixed.

One response to “Equipment Warranties: Do You Know What You’re Getting?”

  1. Jordan says:

    Some very important points here. This is crucial information for those working in construction to have.

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Integrated Teams Boost Success on Construction Projects

September 9, 2015, 8:14 am

Construction savvy owners have increased their demand for turn-key services and a greater level of detailed information far earlier in the project planning process. This has led designers and contractors to increase their focus on collaboration in order to provide not only planning and design services, but also budgeting and constructability support that help guide and define the design. Given this new dynamic, there are elements of which owners should be aware when hiring design and construction partners for a project. The best partnerships are intentional. Because of the complexity of planning, budgeting and executing the design and construction of many types of projects, leading owners are increasingly looking for integrated design and construction teams to deliver a turn-key service. Designers and contractors strategically align to respond to these opportunities. The most successful partnerships (and projects) are those composed of firms that have identified each other as a cultural fit and are intentionally looking for opportunities to work together. As an example, several years ago Shook Construction identified a design firm whose resume rivaled our own. By identifying and intentionally building a relationship with a firm who shared our capabilities and culture, we built a partnership whose people work well together and deliver great value for our clients. The delivery method doesn’t matter. IPD, CMR, GC, D-B. You can play acronym Bingo with the number and varieties of delivery methods that exist in the market. What is important is that delivery strategy prevents the early engagement of a turnkey team. Owners will find that intelligent design and construction firms are willing to provide upfront support and counsel, regardless of the preferred contractual method, because it is the best opportunity to learn and understand the client’s business. This enables them to show maximum value during the selection phase of the project and win the customer’s business. Shook Construction is willing to provide such initial support for little or no compensation because we have found time and again that our willingness to get involved early and provide value increases the likelihood of the project moving forward, which enhances the opportunity that we will be able to do the work. Master planning and conceptual estimating are the new normal. On the design side, owners aren’t looking just for architectural or engineering services; they also want to understand how the new or upgraded facility fits today’s business needs and how it can accommodate future growth. Designers must be capable of providing this long-term planning support as a baseline service offering. From a construction stand-point, the ability to provide real-market feedback on both the price and schedule is an invaluable planning tool for the owner’s financial forecasting. To provide this support with the little information available at the master plan phase, contractors must become more sophisticated at conceptual estimating, providing detailed cost data by filling in the blanks of the design and making educated assumptions about the project. The construction industry continues to evolve as owners require increasingly more in-depth planning and data to inform their near- and long-term facility’s needs. Hiring companies that can understand the key points discussed above and can embrace this new normal will provide the best service and solutions.

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