Blog/News

Employee Spotlight: Randall Beck

August 8, 2018, 12:31 pm

Randall Beck has had a prosperous career due to his openness to change–whether that is by preparing for the unexpected or adjusting his leadership style. After working on countless projects, he has found the best equation for being successful in this field of work: by using his extensive engineering knowledge and believing in himself.

What is the most important thing you do each day when prepping for your work day?

Expect the unexpected. I can never predict every single thing that happens on a jobsite. I have to allow the unexpected to happen and just go with it. The way I handle it is what matters.

What are the most important qualities of a leader?

A leader must understand that not everyone responds the same. What works best for one person may not work for another. Having a leadership style that is flexible and adaptable to the multiple personalities on your team will almost always guarantee you success.

Who inspires you?

I am inspired by anyone who goes above and beyond their expectations for themselves. This motivates me to push myself every day and do my absolute best. When I fail, I don’t give up. I remind myself of my own potential and try again. 

What’s the coolest thing you’re working on right now?

Water treatment plants are the best projects there are. We use all aspects of Civil and Mechanical engineering in every job we do. I always enjoy bringing all the knowledge I’ve gained in this industry to one project and watching it come together to create a final product.

What is a specific skill-set or attribute you possess that you believe adds value to your projects?

My engineering skill set is something I bring to the table when I’m working on a project. It gives me an advantage because it allows me to understand why things are designed a certain way. Once I figure it out, I can think of ways to build more efficiently.

 What is the most important lesson you have learned in the last year?

I’ve found that having goals and dreams are key to finding happiness. If you’re unhappy, you’re not going to be motivated to be your best self. Not only do you suffer, but so does your potential for creating great things. So, for your own sake, find something you’re passionate about and enjoy doing!

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Employee Spotlight: Jim Trueblood

June 20, 2018, 9:10 am

Jim Trueblood’s interest in building has led to him having a well-rounded career in the construction industry. He has worn many hats, from carpenter to general foremen to his current role as project superintendent in our Mission Critical market segment. Every day, he is approaching problems from different angles, looking for the best solutions.

Construction can be a challenging business. Do you have a specific approach or philosophy you use to tackle challenges as they arise on site?

Every problem has a solution. There is no need to make an issue bigger than it needs to be.

What are the most important qualities of a leader?

A leader should possess these three qualities: the abilities to listen, analyze, and measure his or her reactions. In my experience, I’ve discovered this combination works wonders and results in the best outcomes.

What does safety mean to you?

Taking care of my coworkers.

Who inspires you?

My kids inspire me every day.

What is a specific skill-set or attribute you possess that you believe adds value to your projects?

People know they can approach me with a problem and I won’t overreact in a negative manner. It is essential to work well with others, especially on a project site. So much more is accomplished as a team instead of as a group of divided individuals.

What is the most important lesson you have learned in the past year?

If people feel like they have investment in a decision, they will have more interest in the outcome.

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Employee Spotlight: J.D. Craft

May 2, 2018, 3:03 pm

J.D. Craft is no stranger to working outdoors. His childhood was spent growing up on a farm, which led to him later wanting a career where he could be outside as much as possible. He began his career as a carpenter and now serves as a project superintendent for Shook.

Construction can be a challenging business. Do you have a specific approach or philosophy you use to tackle challenges as they arise on site?

I keep in mind that I’m unable to control everything. Construction has taught me to prepare for the worst-case scenario—you never know what to expect.

What are the most important qualities of a leader?

Having the ability to adapt to your environment, as well as maintaining a level head when things go wrong.

What does safety mean to you?

Sending everyone home in one piece! The last thing I want is to have to take somebody to the hospital, or worse.

What is a specific skillset or attribute you possess that you believe adds value to your projects?

I can picture shapes before we build them, so I have a pretty good idea of what will or will not look good.

What is the most important lesson you have learned in the last year?

Those who can, do.

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Construction Engineering Scholarship Recipient Joins Shook’s Ranks

March 7, 2018, 8:51 am

We are excited to announce that David Ramsey, the 2017 recipient of Shook’s annual Construction Engineering Scholarship at the University of Dayton (UD), is joining our team as a project engineer in our water resource business segment in the Midwest. Soon to graduate from UD with a degree in civil engineering, David already has an impressive amount of experience in his chosen field.

During his time at UD, he was a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) and was elected to Social Chair two years running. His co-op with Adams Robinson Enterprises and summer volunteer work for UD’s Engineers in Technical Humanitarian Opportunities of Service learning (ETHOS) program gave him valuable experience in engineering and water treatment construction.

He enjoyed his past experiences in his co-op and service learning program and sees Shook as the next step in his career. His interview convinced him, as he felt the connection with our people and the culture of our Shook family.

His goal is to improve communities’ quality of life by using his skills in his career. He fits right in at Shook, where our mission is to dramatically improve the communities we serve.

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Christina Friend Named Director of Human Resources

February 12, 2018, 12:11 pm

 

Because of her credentials and her continued contributions to the company, Christina Friend is Shook’s new director of human resources and project administration. She is an outstanding representative of the company’s culture and values, and we are excited to have her take on this leadership role within the company.

With a Masters of Business Administration with a concentration in HR, Christina originally was hired by Shook in 2006 to serve as an office manager in our Indianapolis office. She was responsible for the establishment of our project administration group, which under her guidance has realigned many of our internal work-flows, increased our efficiency, and enabled our project teams to increase their focus on project delivery and customer service.

From the onset of her time here, Christina demonstrated an outstanding balance of task management and critical thinking skills. She is a fun, likable teammate who interjects her personality and energy into her daily work.

 

One response to “Christina Friend Named Director of Human Resources”

  1. Kim Massie says:

    Congratulations Christina on a well deserved promotion!

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Employee Spotlight: Eric Doench

November 10, 2017, 6:15 am

Eric Doench

With a little nudge and inspiration from his father, Eric began his career in the construction industry in 1986 after graduating from the University of Cincinnati. Shortly thereafter, a now-retired Mike Eckley took Eric under his wing and molded him into the project manager he is today. Everything in between has been an exciting learning process in all things construction.

What inspired you to get into this career?

I found the construction industry because of a trifecta of factors: 1) I love building things; 2) I love the outdoors; and 3) my father was an engineer. My father sat behind a drawings table designing HVAC systems. This did not sound fun to me. So my father suggested pursuing a civil engineering degree. Now, I build things, spend ample time outside, and am an engineer. Problem solved.

What is the most important thing you do each day when prepping for your workday?

When I’m on the job, I like to go out and say good morning to as many workers as I can. They are busting their butts for us and I want them to know that I realize this.

What is a specific skill-set or attribute you possess that you believe adds value to your projects?

As the saying goes, “you are only as successful as those you surround yourself with.” And so it is with a construction project. The end result is that we want a profitable job and a happy client who wants us to build their next project. For a job to be profitable, you have to get it done on or ahead of schedule. For that to happen, every entity on the project needs to be on the same page with the same goal in mind. If the job runs like a well-oiled machine and gets done on time, then the client will be happy. I want Shook Construction to shine. I want the architects and engineers to shine. Most importantly, I want our subcontractors to shine. Get in and get out, and let’s go build another one.

What’s the coolest thing you’re working on right now?

Building half a dozen Dayton Metro Libraries. The ribbon cutting ceremonies are the best, especially in the children’s area. To see these little kids just running around and being enthralled with all the new surroundings and books… Can’t help but bring a smile to your face.

Who inspires you?

My father. Even though he is gone, I still look to him for advice. “What would Frank do?”

One response to “Employee Spotlight: Eric Doench”

  1. ROBERT E CUPP says:

    Eric Doench is a credit to his profession, his company and the entire Miami Valley Buiding counsel.My name is Bob Cupp, former and retired VP from Dayton Debra-Kuempel: I have worked with Eric along with his former mentor, Mike Eckley on many projects and have always found them to be respectful and fair to work for as a sub-contractor. Thier team always without question, first, looked out for the owner, and secondly, they were always good stewards and fine representatives of Shook and lastly, always brought the projects to an end, wih a win win for all people represented,

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Employee Spotlight: Joe Weaver

October 12, 2017, 8:00 am

Joe Weaver

Joe grew up working with his hands. He worked with his father every summer throughout junior and high school in remodeling. After starting his professional career as a lead installer and carpenter, he eventually joined the Shook team as a project superintendent where he currently oversees multiple projects at the University of Dayton.

What inspired you to get into this career?

I enjoy the changing environment and the personal gratification of seeing a project through completion. I believe that my inspiration originated when I became a young father and having to step up to the plate. But at the end of the day, my own father is who inspired me and the pursuit of purpose is what continues to drive me today.

Do you have a specific approach or philosophy you use to tackle challenges as they arise on site?

I lean towards a collaborative solution, reaching out to a group to solve challenges after I have analyzed them myself. I try to look at what may have caused the issue and then train the team and give them a chance to take ownership in the solution.

What is the most important thing you do each day when prepping for your workday?

Drink coffee! Then I break out attainable tasks to fit in between what already might be slated for the day.

What are the most important qualities of a leader?

Reliability, communication, passion, innovation and consistency.

What’s the coolest thing you’re working on right now?

The finalization of a research and development laboratory at the University of Dayton. This nine-month, multiple phase project consisted of heavy coordination of two shifts of construction work… all while maintaining occupancy of the existing building.

Who inspires you?

Mostly, my wife and daughter. They give me a reason to be.

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Employee Spotlight: Andy Lowther

September 14, 2017, 8:22 am

Andy Lowther

Andrew has worn many hats at several other companies before joining the Shook family. Those experiences have equipped him to help expand our education market segment in Northeast Ohio.

What inspired you to get into this career?

My grandfather, who was a carpenter. I worked with him during the summers since middle school. Since I was good at school, he encouraged me to work with my brains and not my brawn. With the help of my high school counselor, I discovered the construction management program at The Ohio State University. The rest is history.

What is the most important thing you do each day when prepping for your workday?

Coffee… I drink coffee. Then I make an action plan for the day. I always carry a pocket notebook to write things down. It is easy to forget things. If I check my notebook, it reminds me of things I noted earlier. Then I will address those items before adding more notes.

What is a specific skill-set or attribute you possess that you believe adds value to your projects?

Determination and hard work. I grew up a wrestler and those attributes were developed over a lifetime of wrestling. Those same attributes seem to transfer over into everything I do.

What is the most important lesson you have learned in the last year?

Building relationships. Relationships ensure strong jobs and develop future/ongoing clients.

Who inspires you?

My son. I want to be the best person I can be for him. The more I develop and grow as a person, the better person I can shape my son to be.

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Employee Spotlight: Andrew Knapke

August 10, 2017, 8:00 am

Andrew Knapke

With a degree from The Ohio State University, Andrew has served in a variety of positions, including project superintendent, assistant project manager and project engineer.  He joined the Shook Construction family in 2015 as a project engineer within our education business segment.

What inspired you to get into this career?

Since I was young, I enjoyed building/construction things. What better way to continue that passion than to become a construction manager?

What is a specific skill-set or attribute you possess that you believe adds value to your projects?

I have excellent memory retention.

Do you have a specific approach or philosophy you use to tackle challenges as they arise on site?

I take it one day at a time. It’s important to think logically to determine a resolution and then move forward with the project.

What are the most important qualities of a leader?

The ability to effectively guide team members, as well as keep items moving on track.

What does safety mean to you?

Safety is one of the most important items to be practiced on a daily basis.

What piece of technology helps you most with your job and why?

My computer. It allows me to do my job efficiently. Although, I am excited to try out our new Clevertouch Interactive touch screen, which we will use to display the drawings electronically in our trailer.

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Employee Spotlight: Jerry Roark

July 13, 2017, 8:00 am

Employee Spotlight: Jerry Roark

With 33 years of construction experience under his belt, Jerry has truly worked his way up through the ranks. He began his career as a pre-apprentice, moving to a journeyman carpenter position, then served as a foreman. Now, Jerry is a project superintendent and can tout a 27-year history with Shook Construction.

What inspired you to get into this career?

I wanted to follow in my father’s footsteps, who was a carpenter. Beyond that, I enjoy taking my kids and grandkids around town, pointing out the building projects on which I have worked.

What is the coolest thing you’re working on right now?

The Dayton Metro Library buildings. The project involves several buildings, all of which are unique.

What is a specific skill-set or attribute you possess that you believe adds value to your projects?

Dedication, hands-on experience, common sense, planning the work, as well as communicating with the owners, architects and workforce.

What is the most important thing you do each day when prepping for your workday?

There is no ONE important thing I do. To be successful, I have to have a holistic view of the day. This includes safety planning, planning for the equipment needed that day, ensuring employees have the material needed to the do the job, using the right people for the job, and consulting with the foremen.

What is the most important lesson you have learned in the last year?

How to manage multiple job sites at different locations.

What piece of technology helps you most with your job and why?

My smart phone allows me access to my email while away from the office. In addition, my tablet allows me to pull up current/updated drawings in the field and mark them for as-builts so all crews have updated drawings in the field.

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